What If It All Depends on You?

“The first question which the priest and the Levite asked was: ‘If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?’ But…the good Samaritan reversed the question: ‘If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?”

― Martin Luther King Jr.

God will always bring you to a point of having to get past yourself when it comes to helping people who are in real need. The parable of the Good Samaritan addressed the question, “Who really demonstrates what it means to love your neighbor?” The religious establishment spent its energy trying to help people determine who was and wasn’t actually considered a neighbor. They ended up teaching all the different ways it was possible to NOT live out your faith.

Jesus used this story to demonstrate that God’s love was to be extended to everyone, even the least of these, even when it came at a cost. Helping people who suffer, especially when it comes at a cost, is one of the most essential ways we come to fully understand our own beliefs about God.

The suffering of others can get overwhelming. It can discourage and depress when it doesn’t seem to end. Especially when we don’t know what to do, how to fix it, the right words. One word for it is Compassion Fatigue. Typically this is used to describe people who are directly involved with others who are suffering. Sometimes, networks of family and friends can start to feel drained and at a loss as the suffering of a loved one continues and there doesn’t seem to be an end in sight.

The Good Samaritan lived out loving his neighbor, even as a despised outcast, by putting his money and time where his faith was. He demonstrated his belief and was willing to go even farther by promising to return and continue to fund the recovery. Sometimes recovery comes at a greater cost than we imagined:

  • You have to be faithful and follow up
  • People have emotional needs that they’re not even aware of
  • Stop asking, just do something that you’d want done for yourself
  • Every little thing really does count
  • You don’t have to be friends to be a Good Samaritan
  • Don’t stop praying, pray right now, send a prayer

“They never fail who die in a great cause.”  – George Gordon Byron

The greatest cause you can commit to each day is to find a way to love your neighbor in a real way that matters. You will soon learn that if you make this commitment you and most of your own problems will begin to disappear.

 

 

I Am Willing

A man with leprosy came and knelt in front of Jesus, begging to be healed. “If you are willing, you can heal me and make me clean,” he said. Moved with compassion, Jesus reached out and touched him. “I am willing,” he said. “Be healed!” Instantly the leprosy disappeared, and the man was healed.   (Mark 1:40-42 NLT)

Is that the way you imagine God responding to your pleas for help? Has that been your experience so far? Reaching out to God and hearing Him say to you,

“I am willing”

What about becoming a child of that same God and responding to the pleas that you surely hear all around you in this same way?

What if instead of saying…

…I’m not sure I have time

…I can’t solve that particular problem

…I shouldn’t get into your business like that

…I don’t really know you that well

What if instead of saying what comes to mind first, what makes sense, what is safest, we let God’s Spirit within us speak. What if we listened first to that still, small voice. What if the Spirit desired to say through you to someone else, “I am willing”?

Who knows where the time, resources or emotional courage will come from, but I’m going to follow the Spirit here – and have faith that whatever is needed, He will supply.

In this story of Jesus healing a leper (the type of social outcast who probably suffered more than any other) He not only declares His willingness to change the man’s life forever, he demonstrated to everyone looking how willing He really was. Jesus reached out and touched the leper. This was illegal and would make Jesus unclean as well. But Jesus was willing…to break the rules.

Jesus touches the man first. Who knows when this outcast had ever been touched before. Now, in front of everyone who normally looked away, Jesus reached out and touched him. What do you imagine he must have felt? What must the gathered crowd have thought? Jesus was willing…to demonstrate how deeply God loved His children. 

There were several works of healing that took place that day. The leper was made physically well. His place in society was restored (Jesus commanded him to follow the rules about being declared healed). As important as anything else, he was healed as a person – his worth was acknowledge by the Son of God in front of everyone. Jesus was willing…to reach out and heal the inner wounds that mattered as much. 

These days I keep going back to that command from Paul to the church in Galatia…

Share each other’s burdens, and in this way obey the law of Christ.”  (Galatians 6:2)

Over the past several years, I’ve had so many people demonstrate “I am willing” as they’ve helped me carry burdens right and left. For me, all these loved one’s have demonstrated the law of Christ – they have loved God and loved me, not with words but with their actions. Not an idea, but a certainty.

That kind of love makes it easy to say over and over again, “I am willing.”